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» Why do turkeys cross the street?

HASSO HERING

A perspective from Oregon’s mid-Willamette Valley

Why do turkeys cross the street?

Written September 5th, 2019 by Hasso Hering

For weeks now, residents in West Albany have been reporting on their frequent sightings of a flock of wild turkeys. This encounter Thursday suggests that motorists will want to keep an eye out for them as well.

I ran into these guys on Calappooia Street near Henderson Park between 6 and 7 Thursday night. Well, “ran into” them is wrong. I did not run into them because even though the lighting wasn’t the best and their dark plumage works like camouflage at night, I saw them in time and stopped.

No idea how long this flock is planning to hang around. Are they planning to take up residence and stay through the winter? Does the flock seem to be getting bigger? Turkeys coming in from out of town?

The Albany presence of these birds has been reported in Facebook and other social media for several weeks. So maybe wild turkeys wandering around the streets — and crossing them at leisure, in mid-block, no less — is what we should expect from now on. (hh)

The turkeys on Calapooia Street Thursday evening were not in a hurry.



10 responses to “Why do turkeys cross the street?”

  1. Don says:

    If some one throws them a bread crumb they will take up residency. OHHHH by the way they are like chickens, they cross the road to get to the other side.

  2. J. Jacobson says:

    Under no circumstances should the City make any effort to accommodate the roving gobblers. As the Mayor said, “Not everyone wants to live next door to a turkey.” If the Liberal Wing of Albany’s governing class get their way, our fair city will be overrun by the notoriously slack birds.

  3. Jim Engel says:

    Come Thanksgiving some mid-night poaching may take care of the problem! Those birds are a most nasty problem with an attitude to match. They are neither a protect or endangered animal & should be disposed of!

    • Judith Farmer says:

      Had one come to live at my property in the woods, follows me around, chirps and gobbles, non threatening, I even lock him up at night in coop with chickens and ducks to keep safe. So what’s YOUR problem?

  4. Jeff Senders says:

    Hasso, be careful riding your bike with no wheel fairings through the area the wild turkeys have been. You’ll know what I mean if you do!

  5. Debra Potter says:

    These guys are wild animals like squirrels or ducks. For petes sake leave them alone! They wander, not like they stay in your yard! Why can’t some people enjoy the earth and its wonders?

    • Al Nyman says:

      I hate to tell you that I know a Jefferson resident that has multiple turkeys in his yard and they don’t leave without being hazed.

  6. Gordon L. Shadle says:

    Did the turkeys cross the street or the street cross the turkeys?

    A 40-page city study and quasi-judicial hearing are needed to answer this question.

  7. Richard Vannice says:

    Did you know that turkeys are not native to Oregon? Several years ago ODFW imported them and they have become pests!!!! By the way the meat is tough and stringy – not in the least palatable.
    If they are causing problems on your property call ODFW and see if you can be issued a “HAZING PERMIT” – they are free and can be sent via e mail.

  8. Eldon says:

    Do not ever feed them

 

 
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